Megan's Head

A place where Megan gets off her head.

Category: vegan

Vegan French Toast

  • a recipe without pictures because I ate too fast

I love vegan french toast much more than I ever loved egg french toast because I never liked the egginess of french toast. With vegan french toast you can get it 100% right and it is delicious.

Ingredients

2 slices of thick white bread

2 tbs chickpea flour

1/2 cup non dairy milk (I used soy milk because it’s what I had)

Turmeric, cinnamon, cayenne pepper, salt (as much or as little as you like)

mild oil for cooking

maple syrup

sliced banana

Whisk the flour, milk, spices in a shallow bowl. Soak bread in mix while oil is heating in the pan. Fry until golden. Cover with maple syrup and banana. Try to savour each bite. Mine was gone in a second.

Being Vegan

One of the absolutely surprising and truly positive experiences of my weekend away was how I was treated as a vegan. There were 11 of us women, and I was the only vegan in the group. We did huge communal feast style cooking for lunch and supper, and we took turns, and at every single meal I was taken care of, honoured, consulted and respected. Special food was made for me, but I was never made to feel bad, and not once did I ever go hungry. It was the best and most wonderful response that I have had since becoming a vegan almost 8 months ago.

And it got me thinking. I am much more accustomed to having to defend myself, explain myself and go into battle. My conversations around being a vegan are usually challenging; where people demand to know why I have become vegan, demand a list of where I get my protein, and demand to know how I negotiate the meat eating world. I have even been challenged on my world views, religion (or lack of it), and how I come to terms with having animals as pets.

What this weekend away did for me was make me realise that, really, the tables need to be turned, properly and 180° towards challenging people who eat meat. Just because meat eaters are a majority doesn’t mean they are the ones off the hook. The eating of animals needs to be challenged more than the not eating of them. It is the meat eaters who are problematic, and need to justify and answer for their ways. And this is why they get in first, call us names, become confrontational, and make the Vegan memes. They feel bad, and their best defence is to point fingers and criticise.

I have never tried to force anyone to become a vegan (it took me long enough to commit to it), and I am careful about initiating the vegan conversation. Mainly because I am familiar with a teasing (at best) or even hostile (at worst) response. I am careful not to make my choices impact on others and am used to ‘making a plan’ if people haven’t catered for vegans, or considered the possibility of them. Film sets are a challenge. Mainstream restaurants can be tough going. But truthfully, it should work the other way around; like it does for smokers. Smokers are made to feel bad, and their habit is frowned upon. Don’t you think it is the meat eaters who are like the smokers, not the vegans?

Being vegan – the price you pay

It’s almost three months since I started this vegan journey and I am learning, exploring, discovering (and gaining weight) all the time. Aside from the usual “where do you get your protein?” question, the most common thing I am asked is about how expensive it is to be a vegan. It is so interesting that people think being a vegan is expensive when I have found an animal protein heavy diet almost completely unaffordable. Meat, fish and dairy are very expensive, and, in general, I am spending much less and getting much more. You can go the very expensive, deeply organic route, and buy your tofu from a health shop for R50 a tiny block, or you can get it fresh, like I do, from a Chinese supermarket for R45 for ten blocks.

With some proper sourcing, and a bit of capital outlay on the essentials, like quinoa, nuts, nutritional yeast, tahini, grains and sauces, you can whip together really cheap meals. Even the processed soya meat alternatives like Fry’s are cheaper than most meat products. The rest is largely veg, and my rule is, go seasonal.

Even eating out seems cheaper, with the average price of the vegan option cheaper than the flesh ones.

One thing I am going to have to spend a bit of money on, I imagine, is an iron supplement, and possibly a few others. That might be a bit more pricey. But, on the whole, this journey is not at all cost prohibitive.

 

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén